Thursday, July 21, 2011

Casting the Jewish Royal Lineage

When Lot's oldest daughter persuaded her sister they sleep with their father, she said, " ... so we can give life to seed from our father." (Gen. 19:32) She didn't say, "so we can have children." This seed of Lot will, thereafter, worm its way through successive generations to take its final, eminent status of being integrated into the genetic constitution that will produce the last Jewish King, Moshiach.

Lot's seed passed into the womb of his oldest daughter, and therefrom it traversed through the nation of Moav, when, after many generations, via Ruth, it was grafted onto the Jewish seed of Boaz, the great-grandfather of King David, to become part of the Jewish Royal genome.

The younger daughter also took her father's seed and this too wormed its way through the generations, dwelling temporarily in the nation of Ammon until it was grafted onto the Jewish Royal genome, when Naama, a princess of Ammon, married King Solomon. Their child, Rechavam, then passed forward this new Jewish genetic mosaic, now genetically complete with contributions from Moav and Ammon, to propagate a dynasty from which King Moshiach will rise forth in the future.

As these genetic contributions from Lot were making their way forward, the main Jewish genome, to which they will graft onto, originated with Jacob's son, Yehuda. But not from the combination made by Yehuda and his first wife, but rather via the seed generated together with his daughter-in-law, Tamar. Their child, Peretz, carried forward the Jewish Royal genome. Along its trail, it arrived at Boaz, where the uptake was made by the contribution of Moav. Four generations later the Ammon contribution was taken up. At this point, the Jewish Royal genome was complete, insofar as all the necessary grafting had taken place, and now flowed through purely Jewish channels. The final possessor of this sovereign genome will be King Moshiach.

1 comment:

  1. have a blessed Shabbat! God bless you my friend:)

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